Blog - Absolute Water Pumps

Blog - Absolute Water Pumps

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Slurry Pumping

11/20/2018 6:46 PM

One of the major challenges in choosing the right pump for pumping saltwater is that much of the time, it isn't just water that's coming along for the ride. When purchasing a new water pump for slurry pumping applications, it's important to consider what else will be in your fluid – which can be everything from dirt and sand to bigger rocks, and even larger debris both natural and manmade. 

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Posted in Water Pump How To Information By Scott Carter

DEF Pump Materials

11/2/2018 7:50 PM

Every day, thousands of diesel engines carry goods around the world, keeping us fed, clothed, and entertained. If you've ever been near running diesel engines, you know that there's no shortage of fumes from all the fuel required to keep them going.

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Posted in Water Pump Features By Scott Carter

Salt water causes materials to corrode much faster than fresh water alone, and it isn't simply salt, but other chemicals that can come along for the ride, such as sulfides which can build up in stagnant salt water and eat away at your pump's impeller. Even something as simple as the hardware on a park bench can corrode faster near salt water if it isn't made of the right material. When purchasing a water pump, it's important to consider the best pump materias for salt water. 

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Posted in Water Pump Features By David Seip

Absolute Water Pumps is happy to announce that we now offer the Pacer IPW Series of potable water pumps from Pacer Pumps. Often used by firefighters and the oil industry, Pacer potable pumps are reliable, corrosion resistant, lightweight and safe for drinking water applications.

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Posted in Water Pump Features By Jackson Carter

Water Pump Cavitation

8/7/2018 5:53 PM

One of the biggest risks to the proper function and lifespan of any pump is cavitation.  This term that describes the formation of bubbles or empty spaces within the liquid inside a pump which can cause severe damage over time. To avoid cavitation, it is critcal to select a pump suited for your task.

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Posted in Water Pump How To Information By David Seip

A diaphragm water pump uses the same principles to operate as the cylinders on your vehicle's engine. Inside the pump is a diaphragm, or membrane, made of a rubber or plastic material.

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Posted in Water Pump How To Information By David Seip

A centrifugal water pump is one of the most common types of water pumps available, but how does it work? What are the different parts and what do they do? 

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Posted in Water Pump How To Information By Jackson Carter

What is a Submersible Pump?

6/10/2018 7:06 PM

If you have a sump pump in your basement, you are probably very familiar with submersible pumps. Submersible pumps are operated by hermetically sealed motors and are, as their name suggests, used to pump liquid that they are fully submerged in.  The pump operates by pushing the liquid it is submerged in up to the surface.

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Posted in Water Pump How To Information By David Seip

Imagine your Maintenance Manager comes to you after installing a brand new All-Flo 1.5" aluminum Air Operated Double Diaphragm Pump and says there's a problem with it. How do you respond? Who do you call? Do you make a call without first inspecting the pump? Let's imagine three real-world scenarios in which common problems could occur, what the symptoms are, and how to fix them. Usually, it's an easier fix than you might guess. 

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Posted in Water Pump How To Information By Aaron Jameson

At some point, every pump will reach a point of failure and no longer be serviceable. It doesn’t matter whether it was a $500 pump or a $5,000 pump. Nothing lasts forever. While we all know this, we don’t typically plan for failure. Especially if you are a glass half full person!

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Posted in Water Pump Customers By Scott Carter

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